Sunday, February 8, 2009

Week #6 - A House Is Not A Home

So, I think we've explored the sibling situation enough for now.  This week, I'm really interested to hear a description of your childhood home, or, if you've been married for a while and would rather describe your current home, I'd love to hear it.  Anything you think would be applicable to a book on families would be appreciated.  This includes thoughts on the "vibe" of the house (that may have been portrayed through paint colors, even), how you feel your home compared with that of your friends, how your home as a child differs or is similar to your home now...The possibilities are endless!  Dive in!

7 comments:

  1. My home was very welcoming to anyone and everyone, if we had a visitor or if I brought friends over my mom would automatically start cooking for them, bring out something to drink or munch on in the meantime. It wasn't a quiet house by any means, it was a happy/loud house, music always playing, conversation going on and hardly any of my friends had houses like that so they'd always come over to my house. Our house wasn't huge or anything but very accomodating to anyone who entered.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think we had the smallest house of any of our friends growing up, but we usually flocked there despite the lack of space. It was humble and modest, but definitely more than four walls. I attribute that to the atmosphere my mother created. One that emulated acceptance and warmth. If people arrived at mealtime, another plate was simply added to the table. When we were loud and obnoxious during sleepovers, there was never an angry rebuke by an adult, but a gentle reminder that at 4 in the morning, it was perhaps best to get some rest. Essentially, it was a home where children were allowed to be children free of criticism, condescension or pressure to be anything other than what we wanted to be.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Growing up, I was always welcome to eat any food that I wanted at my friends' houses. These friends often assumed a similar "open fridge" policy at my house, which several times got me in trouble with my parents. My house had a an "ask before you eat" policy for most food that my friends would want to eat - they didn't want apples and carrots. Though it wasn't my parent's intention at all, this was always a source of discomfort for me when my friends came to visit. Other restricts on things like the TV/Gaming systems also made me uncomfortable having friends over, even though my parents loved my friends and wanted them to come.

    The result of this and other little things? My siblings and I all grew up spending most of our time with friends at their house.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Well after 8 months in an RV I "really" love my house. But I miss your home Britty and all the fun we had with all those great grand children.
    Grandpa and I miss you all. There is no place like yours and our home. love you Britty. ---Grandma

    ReplyDelete
  5. We just moved from a little 200 year old farm house in Upstate New York. When we first moved in, I couldn't wait to move out! It was such a rough transition for me because I had almost always grown up in a newly built, clean, functioning home and this home was in serious need of some TLC! My eyes were sure opened!
    Over time and with a lot of hard work, we turned this shack into a home, and even brought a newborn baby home to it! I have learned that the house itself isn't such a big factor of the environment, even though every little bit helps, but anyone can turn a house into a home. It takes love, laughter, hard work, and memories! It isn't what you live in, but how you live within. When we moved away from the "haunted house" I cried! So many of my memories were within those walls and I had grown to love that home. I will miss it much!

    ReplyDelete
  6. There's nothing like the home one grows up in. (I haven't found a place like it since I left!) Even today, despite how many years I've been gone, I'll hear a tune, or see or smell something, and memories start popping up all over. Seasons and weather, activities in the yard, etc. I remember specific characterisitcs about rooms, carpets, appliances, even our home phone number! Despite the arguments or family issues that seemed to be abundant back then, my memories are fond overall. When i think about how important my memories are, it makes me really feel bad for those who aren't as fortunate.

    ReplyDelete