Sunday, January 11, 2009

Week #2 - Baaaaa...People in Sheep's Clothing

Do you have a "black sheep" in your family?  If so, what qualities distinguish this family member from the rest of your family?  Maybe your whole family is a herd of black sheep!  If so, what makes you categorize your family that way?

8 comments:

  1. We do... Their attitude distinguishes them, along with their negativity

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  2. I am probably the black sheep among my immediate family members. I am rather short next to the rest of my siblings and both of my parents. Personality wise though, there isn't a black sheep among us. Unless you want to bring up extended family members...there's some mixed in there. :)

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  3. Well, we dont really have like someone terribly rebellious but the one who i might characterize that way is one of my older brothers who is 26 and hasnt left home since he got back from a mission and doesnt go to school and just plays world of war craft....

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  4. I wouldn't say there's a "black sheep" in my family as far as attitude goes, but I do have one adopted brother so he stands out as the only Asian in a house full of Caucasians! He is the best thing that has ever happened to our family and he is one fantastic kid.

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  5. Black sheep...hmmm. Well, I would say that I don't have just one, but a few. I would classify them as "black sheep" by their actions in regards to what they learned while growing up. I love them to pieces, but I have a sister and a brother that have chosen to live their lives in ways that are not in keeping with how we were raised.

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  6. My older brother had to be the black sheep of the family. He was always the rebel, for as far back as I can remember. For a lot of my childhood, he was either in juvenile hall or jail. A lot of the time I spent with him through my teen years was in a prison visitation room. My brother passed away about five and a half years ago from an overdose of drugs. Sometimes I wonder, maybe if we hadn't acted like he was a black sheep he wouldn't of fulfilled the role. He always said that the reason he wouldn't go to church with us when he was older was because he had tattoos and he felt like people at church judged him for them. I wish people in our church were more considerate of so-called "black sheep" as well. I think we could all stand to become a little more tolerant and understanding.

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  7. The term "black sheep" is generally used to describe those who don't don't fit their moral family mold. (If you're a Mormon it can mean you've decided not to be 'active'. If its not related to a religious affiliation, it usually means one's chosen activities exceed social moral boundaries.) I think there's more to the concept though. For example, I'm active in the Church AND a law-abiding citizen, but I still feel like a black sheep at times among my active, law-abiding family! Anyone who falls short of any established family 'standard' is naturally going to feel a little out of place. If everyone else has a college degree, the one who doesn't probably feels like the black sheep. If everyone else is married, the one who isn't probably feels like the black sheep. The same goes with having children (and how many), chosen career fields, political affiliations, etc. Even possessions! (Is yours a Chevrolet or a Ford family?) Anyway, none of us is perfect, therefore all of us are black sheep in one way or another. The 2 tricks to survival, and maybe even a little happiness, seem to be 1. doing all you can to make others feel comfortable around you regardless of their faults, and 2. trying to feel confident/comfortable about yourself, despite your own faults, when you're around others who you think have no faults!

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  8. Intersting question and I enjoyed reading the other posts. My family characterizes me as the black sheep but not in an negative sense so to speak. I just don't fit the mold (as mentioned above.) It's taken me awhile with the loving patience of my husband to learn to be comfortable in my own skin and not try and bend like the wind when I'm around others. As I raise my daughter I find it takes a bit for me to also let her be comfortable just being who she is. That means I'm uncomfortable at times but it's worth the discomfort to "break" the cycle. Lots to chew on here.

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